chachaIt seems like every time I think I’m starting to make real forward progress, something sets me back.

I mentioned a few weeks ago that I was pretty sure my rheumatoid disease was not, in fact, in remission as Dr. B seemed to think.  My joint pain had been steadily escalating since spring, with some new joints joining in the fun.

However, my blood tests show zero elevation in any of the inflammatory factors, and there is zero visible swelling in my joints.  So I asked the nurse who called with the results what Dr. B thought might be causing my now 5/10 pain level.  She called me back later to let me know Dr. B thinks it’s “the fibro”.

The WHAT?

No one had ever talked to me about a fibromyalgia diagnosis.  I knew that I probably met the criteria for it, but it fully depends on self-reported information about pain and impact on daily activities.  So pretty much anyone who reports widespread pain with a  negative impact on daily activities without another diagnosis found, gets a fibro diagnosis.  It’s the bucket we all get thrown into if we keep insisting we hurt and the docs can’t find anything else.  Medically speaking, it’s a trash-can diagnosis.  It doesn’t help that frankly some people take advantage of the self-reported nature of the diagnostic criteria in order to gain sympathy, pain medication,  and even disability income.

At any rate, the nurse said the doc wanted to put me on Cymbalta and Gabapentin.  I’ve had trouble with Cymbalta in the past and told the nurse that I’d been on Savella for fatigue because of my past issues with Cymbalta.  She brightened up and said that Savella was even better, and since I’d been on it without issue, we’d just start it up again.  After I got off the phone, it occurred to me that I’d tapered off the Savella right about the time the pain started up, so it lent credence to Dr. B’s assessment.

So I’m ramping up my Savella doses again, and the pain is lessening.  So I guess that I really do have fibromyalgia, and I’m lucky in that there’s a medication that helps.  It’s a med I tolerated well, which given my history of side effects and adverse reactions, is a minor miracle.

I’m also finding that if I can drag my happy butt off the couch and go swimming or walking, I do feel better as long as the exercise is not overly strenuous.  It’s the dragging myself off the couch when I feel like hammered dog poo that’s the challenge.

I even managed to finish my first 5K with my new weight loss surgery support group.  The Mister did it with us, and my time actually puts me in the acceptable pace rates for many of the popular 5K walk/runs.  Part of me wants to start doing them periodically, but part of me doesn’t like the thought of joining huge crowds of people to walk 3.2 miles.  Once grad school is over, we’ll see what I have the time and energy for.

This forward and back pattern is discouraging but as the quote says, if you look at it right it’s a Cha-Cha.  I guess the trick is to keep finding ways to move forward, while finding the right music for the dance.

I hadn't reviewed the Pill Suite yet because I'd had issues with the bags.  I have since gotten replacements and am now THRILLED with this solution for my meds and want to share.

As most Spoonies, I have a LOT of medications/supplements I take multiple times a day.  I have struggled with the standard pill sorters, especially with travel and when I needed to take pills 3 times a day.

I happened on the little zip-lock medication bags at the pharmacy prior to one business trip, and found that it was a MUCH better solution - at least for travel - than the weekly organizers I'd been using.  I could prepare as many days as I needed, as many times a day as I needed, and put all of it in a sandwich zip-lock bag in my carryon.  It was a royal pain to load them all, though.  I first had to sort my pills into the standard weekly sorter, then close all of the lids and open each one to get the meds for that dose to put in the individual bag.  Still, better than nothing.

Then I found the Pill Suite on Grommet.  The sorter looks like a normal 7-day pill organizer, but it has a rotating lid with a funnel that lets you get just that one medication time's worth of pills without fussing with individual lids for each day.

For me, this invention alone would change the way I handled my meds.  In fact, I had already decided if the rest of the system didn't work out, it was worth it just to have this handy little dude.  I would just use these to sort and load the little zip-lock bags from the pharmacy.  I actually bought 2 so I can do a week's worth of am and pm at the same time, or 14 days of one or the other.

The selling point of the product however, is the sealer and the little recyclable bags that it uses.  This is like a tiny vacuum sealer, but without the vacuum.

The bags have a perforated edge that easily tears off in order to get the pills back out.  This makes them a one-time use product, but that's cleaner than a multi-use bag, and they are recyclable.

If you take more pills at a time than will fit in this bag, bless you.  My morning regimen currently has 7 pills including 1 horse-sized capsule, and I take a little less than 1/2 of the availble space for pills.  (You need to leave room for the sealing process at the top.)

I will note that the first set of bags I got with the system were incredibly difficult to open, to the point of aggravating the arthritis in my fingers and requiring me to pry the layers apart with a tool like a pen once open.  I contacted the manufacturer, and they said they'd had a bad manufacturing batch, and offered to send replacements.  I've had zero issues with the new bags.  They open super-easy off the roll and I've had no problems with them.

This seems like overkill, I know.  And I AM an admitted gadget freak.  This might be overkill for someone who doesn't have a lot of meds, or only takes them once, maybe twice a day.  But even at just 2 medication times a day (my current), this system is flexible enough for me to set up 1 week at a time, or a month at a time based on my needs.  And if I have to start taking a mid-day dose of something in the future, again that's easy to do.

Caretakers may find this better as well, as the bags can be labeled in any way needed, and as many medication times/days as needed can be prepared in advance.  Morning med packs can be stored in a different place than evening med packs if that's more appropriate.

Travellers will find this immensely helpful.  Of course, check with laws/regulations about needing original labels or other documentation.  (I have my pharmacy app on my phone that documents my presciptions and has pictures of the pills for reference, and I always leave controlled medications in their original package.)

Information and ordering are available at Pill Suite and I have also seen the system and refills available on Amazon and it was originally sold on Grommet.

And just so you know - I have received no money or other stuff of value from anyone for my review here.  I bought the system full price, and no one asked me to post this review.

A few weeks ago I got to take a week long business trip to Irvine, California.  I took advantage of the opportunity to go out to the beach a couple of evenings I was there, and walk in the sand.

I lived about a year and a half in Hawaii when I was a child, and it's been that long since I've been in real surf.  (I maintain that beaches in the Gulf of Mexico do NOT have real surf.)

It was awesome to walk on the beach in the edges of the surf.  It was awesome in a different way to get reminded of the sheer power of the ocean when I didn't pay attention and got my feet yanked out from under me by one of the larger waves.  (No serious damage was done, just Mother Nature reminding me that she'll knock you on your ass if you don't respect her.)

As it was, I walked a LOT further down the beach and back than I originally intended to.  I had forgotten that walking on sand at an incline is a LOT more strain on the legs and feet than on level ground.  So I was incredibly sore when I got back to my car (not to mention having sand EVERYWHERE) but it didn't appear to flare my rheumatoid disease any worse than it already was.

Yes, it appears that my RD/PsA is not in remission as we had hoped.  We're currently waiting on blood test results that will inform our treatment decision, but just from my pain levels and where the pain is, I can definitively say I am *not* in remission.  It was a nice thought, but now it's time to reassess, remake the plans, and move forward.  My pain levels are reaching the point of interfering with good sleep and trying to keep me from moving.  But my week in California taught me that moving actually lessens the pain - at least after the first few minutes.  I was

My pain levels are reaching the point of interfering with good sleep and trying to keep me from moving.  But my week in California taught me that moving actually lessens the pain - at least after the first few minutes.  I was in a situation where because of parking costs, I had to walk about 2 city blocks each way to get lunch every day.  This is in addition to my evening forays to the beaches.  Once I got up and started moving, I felt better.  (The weather helped because it was drop-dead gorgeous the entire time I was there.)  So I'm committed to stay on my exercise program.  Right now I'm focusing on water walking/swimming twice a week, and plan to start adding on light weight training soon.

I also went to a meeting of an in-person weight loss surgery support group, and found that I like them and the format very much.  They even convinced me to join them in a 5K walk later this month.  So the Mister and I are going to start walking as much as we can in the Texas heat to prepare for it (he's doing the 5K with me).  I may not finish, but I'm going to give it my best shot.  I have told my friends who are runners that this is NOT a gateway for me to start running.  They just laughed.

So that's where things stand in TheAntiChick's world.  Not perfect, but doing OK.

So today marks the one year anniversary of my life-changing surgery.  I had my checkup with my surgeon yesterday and got the best surprise.

You see, I have a scale that is consistent but not accurate.  It has consistently throughout this process weighed me 5 lbs lighter than the doctor's scales.  I thought I could trust it.  Yesterday morning, I got on and it said 198# which I converted in my head to 203#.  I had been down to right at 200# and had been waiting to break into what WLS peeps call "ONE-der-land".  I'd perversely hoped that it would happen for my check up day.  But alas, weight fluctuations happen and while I wasn't upset about the seeming gain, I was a little disappointed to have my official 1-year weight over 200#.

But, when I got on my doctor's scales, this is what was displayed:  199.74# with a BMI of 29.5 - which made me VERY happy.

A BMI of under 30 means I am no longer clinically obese, now I'm just overweight.  I actually reached that point a few pounds ago, but this is the first time it's been recorded in my chart.

I don't like the BMI for a lot of reasons, but it is the measurement that's used most often clinically.  So getting that "Obesity" classification off my record is a big win.

I don't usually post a lot of pictures on this blog, but today's a special day.  Here's where I started.  The picture on the left was a few years ago at my nephew's wedding, the one on the right is my wedding in 2015.  I topped out at 306# a little after this.  I don't actually have any pictures of me at my highest weight.

 

 

Here's my pics today:

 

And a face-to-face comparison from just before surgery to now.  This is where I think the weight loss REALLY shows:

I've already written about the health improvements I've seen from the WLS.  While I'm afraid that my rheumatic disease is not, in fact, in remission, the other improvements are amazing.

I was setting up my pills today for the next couple of weeks and kept looking for more pills.  That can't be all the medicine I take!  Yep.  I now have only 4 prescriptions I take regularly - my allergy medication (one pill and a nose spray), my proton-pump inhibitor to protect my sleeve from meds, and my cholesterol pill.  I hope to lose the cholesterol pill soon as well.  I do still have migraine medicine for when I need it, but no longer take a preventative.  Even with the vitamins and supplements I need to take, I'm taking MUCH less each day than I used to.

So 1 year out.  Not quite to goal, but under 200# and that's amazing.

More to come...

It's been a little over a year since I started tracking my "Level 10 Life" and I thought it was time for an update. I think I've been improving my life in the last year, so it's interesting to see it graphically represented.

Companions - My goal this year was to cultivate closer relationships with my core group of companions. Between #gradSchoolSucks, chronic illness, weight loss surgery, and other demands on my time, I haven't spent as much time with the people I care about but I think it's been a little better. Progress, not perfection, right?

Romance - The Mister continues to be the most awesome mate for me. We had our first real honest to goodness fight recently, and I'm frankly impressed with the way we recovered from it. I have never been with anyone where we were able to be painfully open and honest about the things that drove the fight (because it's rarely about whatever the fight was about) and end up closer as a result. He's awesome, and we're awesome together.

Health - I did one of the best things I have ever done for my health last year, with the weight loss surgery. I've had some rough spots since health-wise but it remains a really good decision, I think. I'm able to move easier than I could last year and I just overall feel better, even when my chronic illnesses are fighting me. I gave myself credit for that, but there's still a lot to be done. I just signed up with Good Measures which provides consultation with Registered Dieticians who are experienced with bariatric patients. Had my first consult this morning, and am really feeling good about this step as well. My goals for the next year are to improve the quality and variety of my diet, and get back to working out reguarly (including weights) so I also need to get enough protein in to support muscle gain.

Environment - We've de-cluttered quite a bit, even though you can't tell right now from all the boxes piled up in my front room right now. I haven't posted about it here, but Munchkin ended up moving home after the roommate situation went WAY south. She'll be here for a year or so pursuing her career goals and building up a financial reserve for her next foray into independence. So a lot of the decluttering and home maintenance has gotten set aside, but there's still some improvement.

Career - I've been increasing my responsibility and skill set at work, and will graduate this December with my master's, so I'm doing good in this arena. Next year will be focused on finding the next job, if that's in the cards.

Finances - Haven't managed many of the financial goals, but we did buy The Mister a used truck for cash, and paid off my jalopy. We're doing better than just treading water, but there's still a long way to go on this. Re-committing to YNAB again.

Personal Growth - This is completely stagnated while #gradSchoolSucks. I don't have the bandwidth to do much here. I do want to start journaling regularly again, and grad school ends in December, so that'll be when I can really start moving on this area again.

Spirituality - Pretty much the same response as for Personal Growth. Not a lot of time to focus on this.

Recreation - Ditto.

Giving - I'm still medic-ing for the derby league, and really enjoy that. Nothing else has really changed, but as with Personal Growth/Spirituality/Recreation, 2018 will be my year!

So in summary, some forward progress in the areas I prioritized this year through WLS and Spoonie Life, and still lots of room for improvement.


Picture from the No Body Shame website

I have previously talked about my struggle with the cognitive dissonance between wanting to support/promote/embody body positivity even though I have had WLS.  Cognitive Dissonance

My news feed this morning sent me to Dances With Fat, specifically to a post talking about not allowing weight loss talk in body positive spaces.
Do Body Positive Spaces Have to Allow Weight Loss Talk?

And this led me to another post by the same person about Weight Loss and Size Acceptance

These two posts got me to thinking hard about body positivity and weight loss, specifically weight loss surgery. I don't want to think that I am not an advocate of body positivity. But the Size Acceptance (SA) community, the Fat Acceptance (FA) community, and the Body Positivity (BP) community seem to have a blanket exclusion for anyone who wants to change their body size/shape, regardless of the reason.

There are two separate issues I identified with the articles linked above - speech and behavior in SA/FA/BP spaces, and where people who want to change their bodies for whatever reason fit in the movement.

I agree that SA/FA/BP communities need safe spaces in both internet space and meat space, away from talk about weight loss. I totally get that and wholly support it. I don't expect to go into SA/FA/BP spaces and say or do anything that sends the message that people of size need to change themselves. It's their space, and they establish guidelines for speech and behavior in order to protect the other people in that space. It would be pretty rude of me to go in there and say that people are okay at whatever size but that it's still better, for me at least, to be smaller.

Then there's how people who have or want to lose weight fit in the SA/FA/BP movement. I know a lot of people through my WLS support boards who got fed up with their body and size and looking "better" is their primary motivation for weight loss. That's totally cool, and I consider that as valid of a reason for weight loss as any other. But I'd have a hard time saying that they promote body positivity or size acceptance.  They can advocate against discrimination and bullying of people of size (and most do), but when aesthetic reasons are their primary motivation, it doesn't mesh with the ideals of body positivity.

Then there are people who share my mindset about weight loss. My primary motivation is my health, period. If I could have affected the health improvements I have had through WLS through any other means, I would have done it. I wasn't all that unhappy with my size, and would never have done anything this radical just to fit in smaller clothing. I am finding myself thrilled with some of the superficial changes, but they are absolutely secondary (or even tertiary) to my health goals. I had WLS *because* I love myself.  But the SA/FA/BP community doesn't just want me to respect their need for safe spaces without diet talk, they want me to believe that I'm not SA/FA/BP because I want to be healthier.

Therein lies the problem for me. One woman commented  that she needs to lose some weight because the fat itself is impeding her from being able to take care of herself. Her lymphedema (extreme swelling of the extremities) requires her to compression wrap her legs and she's unable to physically do it because of the amount of belly fat she carries. Her health is impaired by the fat itself. It's not a theoretical exercise of whether fat people can be healthy, or if losing weight really leads to better health. Her fat keeps her from taking care of herself. She doesn't care about fitting into smaller clothes or an airline seat, she needs to be able to move well enough to maintain her own hygiene, dress herself, and take care of her medical needs. Yet the author's response was that losing weight is never permanent, and the commenter needs to focus on accepting herself where she is.

As a nurse, this kind of one-way thinking horrifies me.  Hell, as a rational thinking human, this horrifies me.

Yes, the evidence shows that diet and lifestyle changes are rarely successful long-term. The evidence also does not support the idea that being overweight automatically means that someone is not healthy, or that someone who is thin is automatically healthy. Weight is not the only factor in health, and it needs to stop being treated as if it is. The overweight patient with an ear infection needs treatment for the infection, not to be told to lose weight. The overweight patient who tears a major ligament in their knee needs surgery and physical therapy, not to be told there's nothing to be done until they lose a set amount of weight. Shaming someone about their weight is counter-productive. No one should feel bad about themselves because of their weight/size. And frankly, if you're not part of that person's medical team, their weight and size is none of your concern.

But when the excess tissue ITSELF is causing health problems, it is irresponsible to maintain that the person should do nothing about it in the name of SA/FA/BP. And some health conditions, even if they are not directly caused by excess weight, can be vastly improved by losing weight. It is irresponsible to tell a person that there is no benefit to losing weight because it cannot be kept off. Shaming a person for wanting to better care for their body should be completely against the tenets of Body Positivity. That person is not saying other people need to make the same choice or preaching that her size is unacceptable. She is saying that she - and she alone - needs to try to do something in order to maintain or improve her health.

Interestingly, when doing a little research for this post, I found that the Health at Every Size (HAES) curricula does not, in fact, teach that everyone is at the size/weight they should be, and instead states that many people have weight-related health concerns. HAES advocates learning to eat intuitively and physical movement to improve health. The difference is that HAES wants people (especially medical professionals) to start looking at more health indicators than weight and de-emphasize weight as a primary health indicator.

Here's what I believe. People of all sizes need to learn to love their bodies and quit buying into society's media-driven image of what beauty is because diversity is beautiful.  People who don't fit society's warped view of an appropriate size/weight suffer a great deal of discrimination right now. Size shouldn't impact your ability to get a job or raise or promotion. It shouldn't impact your ability to exist in public spaces (doors, chairs, etc.). It shouldn't be the only thing medical professionals look at, and it absolutely shouldn't be a determining factor in treatment decisions. Fat is not a moral failing, and it shouldn't be treated as one. Fat people aren't lazy, and they are not fat because they have no self-control. No one should be harassed or bullied in any fashion because of their size. In fact, someone's size/weight is none of your business unless you're on their medical team. Even then, the person deserves nothing less than professional and compassionate care.  Diets don't work and are very damaging to health.  Weight-cycling is more damaging to someone's health than being overweight alone.  Basically, I believe almost everything that the SA/FA/BP groups purport to believe.  The only point I differ on is the exclusion of people who have reasons to need to change their body.

So I'd like someone to educate me as to why I have no place in the SA/FA/BP movement. Because I just don't get it.

I haven't as yet posted much with the Politics tag in this blog. There's been so much going on in my life with #gradSchoolSucks and WLS and living with rheumatoid disease, that politics necessarily took a back seat. The political climate has certainly changed over the last six months, and I am finding myself getting more and more vocal about politics in every arena as a result.

I'm a progressive liberal, and I'm not ashamed of it. Despite what many may think, this is NOT contrary to being fiscally responsible, or to having personal liberty. I also make a distinction between progressivism and liberalism. David Sirota in his blog "What's the Difference Between a Liberal and a Progressive" (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-sirota/whats-the-difference-betw_b_9140.html) states the following:

[...] there is a fundamental difference when it comes to core economic issues. It seems to me that traditional “liberals” in our current parlance are those who focus on using taxpayer money to help better society. A “progressive” are those who focus on using government power to make large institutions play by a set of rules.

To put it in more concrete terms - a liberal solution to some of our current problems with high energy costs would be to increase funding for programs like the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). A more “progressive” solution would be to increase LIHEAP but also crack down on price gouging and pass laws better-regulating the oil industry’s profiteering and market manipulation tactics. A liberal policy towards prescription drugs is one that would throw a lot of taxpayer cash at the pharmaceutical industry to get them to provide medicine to the poor; A progressive prescription drug policy would be one that centered around price regulations and bulk purchasing in order to force down the actual cost of medicine in America (much of which was originally developed with taxpayer R&D money).

Let’s be clear - most progressives are also liberals, and liberal goals in better funding America’s social safety net are noble and critical.

I realize that this puts me in direct opposition to my friends and family who espouse Conservative and Libertarian ideology (both Big-L and little-L). I disagree that the solution to every problem is "remove the government from the equation" and let people sort things out without government interference.  But that doesn't mean we don't have common ground we could start from.

I agree that there are numerous cases of government overreach (a town north of me is trying to impose building restrictions on people who live outside the city's jurisdiction) and government corruption (too many to list). It would be nice if we lived in a society where people could be trusted to do the right thing and the free market corrected all evils. History tells us that's unrealistic, especially when looking at corporations. A lot of the "government overreach" has been in response to egregious actions on the part of corporations. The Department of Labor and the Fair Labor Standards Act for example is rooted in a history of corporations horribly exploiting and abusing their employees. The classic libertarian response of "they can go get other jobs" doesn't wash, since corporations were able to reap huge financial benefits from the abuse and exploitation of workers too desperate to feed their families to go elsewhere.

I used to agree that it was ridiculous for people to have to go through the time and expense of obtaining a cosmetology license in order to braid hair. Until I got more information on the story from my stylist. Braiding hair seems pretty simple, but in actuality there's a lot of information that someone should understand before opening up a shop. Many clients have had irreparable damage because of products and techniques that are not only damaging to hair, but to the scalp itself. Those who set up shop in their garage or whatever don't have assets to cover the results of a lawsuit, so the injured clients are left with no remedy. Most laws have roots in people being harmed, and trying to prevent it whenever possible, even if the history and reasoning is not apparent to everyone.

In short, it all comes down to what kind of society one wants to live in. The lawless Wild West may sound romantic in bodice-ripping romances and old TV shows. I wouldn't want to live there however, because the reality is that people in groups tend to turn alll "Lord of the Flies". I don't want to live in that kind of society, where ultimately whoever is in power makes the rules and the rest of the people have no say in it, nor any recourse for the abuses of those in power. I see government as the only protection available to people in the society. Right now, corporations are the group in power and our political system has been bent to reflect the goals of corporations and the ultra-rich who run them, instead of protecting the people who are the backbone of the country. Abolition of the government "intrusion" into corporate dealings is the absolute worst thing that could happen in my estimation.

Does government need to be held accountable? Absolutely. Should government programs be held to a higher standard for economy and efficiency than they currently are? Absolutely. Are some government programs too far gone to save? Very likely. Does that mean that every government program should be terminated, and all federal regulatory bodies disbanded? No way, no how. Look at pictures of the air over Los Angeles from the 1960s compared to now.

Downtown Los Angeles smog photographs by the Herald-Examiner Collection (1968, left) and Gary Leonard (2005, right) courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library (http://www.lapl.org/#photo-collection).

Federal regulations are responsible for cleaner air in LA, period. There's still needed improvement in air quality in many cities including LA, but the improvements achieved by the EPA and the regulations that preceded its establishment are directly responsible for the ability to breathe at least decent air in our cities. Right now the EPA is fighting to stay operational, as it's under attack by corporate interests. When did corporate interests trump (pun intentional) the health and welfare of the American citizens? The ideology that government is bad is part of what's allowing the EPA to be gutted, instead of fixing what was broken with it (and I admit there is plenty broken).

Ultimately, we have too large of a society with our 320 million people (Census Bureau, 2015) to manage with a Wild West mentality. Too many corporations are trying (and succeeding) to influence legislation to their financial benefit. And yes, taxes are needed to run the government. I'll write more about taxes in another post. "Taxation is theft" is a catchy meme, but it ignores the responsibility people have to support their society, because of the benefits they reap from it.

I want to live in a society where everyone truly can become whatever they want to be. That requires everyone in the society to have a certain amount of safety net. People who have security in the lower 2 levels of Maslow's hierarchy are more able to contribute positively to society. Meeting those needs is a lot less expensive overall than dealing with the negative consequences as a society for not meeting those needs. A healthy population is one that enhances the GDP and drives the economy, not a sick population with a bunch of really wealthy dudes at the top. A healthy population breeds innovation and discovery, because when people are secure in knowing they have a safe place to live, enough to eat, and healthcare they are able to build new businesses, experiment with ideas, and take chances that those scrabbling for a bare existence cannot. How many cures for cancer remain undiscovered because the kid who would have found it dies due to lack of healthcare and decent food?  Crime drops when people have options and safety as well.

So yes, I am in favor of universal healthcare. I've done a hell of a lot of research on the subject over the years, and as a nurse I've seen what happens to people when we don't have it. I'm in favor of providing safe places for people to live, and healthy food for them. I believe it's the responsibility of the richest nation on Earth to provide these things, and excuses as to why it can't happen are just that - excuses. In this current political climate, the excuses aren't even ideological -- they are for the benefit of oligarchs and corporations.

For me, this goes beyond ideology. Until people stop arguing ideology and start working together for common goals they can agree on, the corporations and oligarchs win. If you believe that the perfect society is one with no regulations, we could at least agree to work together to reduce the ones we agree are the worst. If you believe that the perfect society is one where people are free to pursue their dreams with no restrictions, we could at least agree to keep corporations and oligarchs from abusing and financially enslaving them. If you believe the perfect society is one where everyone is treated equally, but you disagree with me on laws for protected classes, we could at least work to stop the abuses that are currently happening.

Instead, the perfect becomes the enemy of the good. Because you and I don't agree on what the perfect society looks like, we fight about that instead of coming together and promoting the improvements we can agree on. The oligarchs and corporations win and we all lose.

I started writing this post today because last night divergent political viewpoints caused a huge fight between me and one of the most important people in my life. I intended to write about how politics adversely impacts relationships. I'll have more on that subject later. Right now what I want to say to anyone who will actually listen is that there is a common ground when we give up the extremes.

Please, for the love of our country and our future, give up the extremes and start looking for commonality.

 

<--- this pic is where I started

this pic is where I am now -->

I actually started this post back in March, when I was 7 months post-op.  Work, grad school (#gradSchoolSucks btw), family issues, etc. derailed my good intentions to start writing regularly again.

May 17 was my 9 month anniversary of surgery.  I met with my surgeon and my rheumatologist that week.  They were both very happy with my progress.

There are days when I wonder what the heck I did to myself. But they are few and far between, and usually right after I've eaten 1 or 2 bites too many, or eaten something that my sleeve disagreed with. Most days, I really can't complain, and would do this surgery again in a heartbeat.

My rheumatologist believes my rheumatoid disease (RA/PsA) is in remission.  She'll re-do all my bloodwork in August and see where it stands.  Right now, I still have some joint aches, but it's mostly minor.  I seem to have been right about the meds causing a thyroid issue, because all of the associated symptoms are gone.  I am now off my RA/PsA meds, we are tapering off the meds for fatigue, and I accidentally stopped the migraine prevention meds without tapering but didn't have any issues.  Since surgery, I have gotten off (or am currently tapering off) 5 medications, including all blood pressure medicine, the med for fatige, my RD meds, and my migraine preventative.

Back in March, I had to run out at lunch and get some new slacks for work. I had been able to get by through "shopping my closet" for pants I'd stored away years ago thinking "I'll get back into these someday". Well, someday came, and it's now long gone. Those pants from almost 2 decades ago had become too baggy to be respectable, so I took a chance on some lunch shopping.  I went from a 22/24 pant to an off the rack 16.  I couldn't find off the rack pants that fit the last time I was in a 16 as a teenager.  But now "curvy fit" pants are available, and they work for me, as I have a small waist compared to my hips.  I also didn't plan ahead, and did the shopping in 3" heels, without any issues.  That would have crippled me a year ago.

Now at the end of June, those pants are getting loose.  Not so loose that I have to replace them, but starting to look a little sloppy.  I'm now in an adult Large shirt from a 3X.  I bought skorts at Sam's the other day, which never could have happened when I was in plus sizes.  I have lost 102# as of right now.  My BMI is teetering on the overweight/obese line.  One more pound lost, and I will no longer be clinically obese.  I could stop losing weight right now and all of my docs would be thrilled.  But I'm not stopping.  I have another 30# or so to lose to get to my target weight, which I set by looking back to the weight I was the last time I looked and felt awesome.

I still haven't started exercising regularly again since the health issues of the winter/spring.  But I'm feeling good and it's only my insane time pressures with work and school that are keeping me from it.  I have a plan to ease back into the workouts so I can start rebuilding some lost muscle.

Life is pretty darned good from this side, I must say.

 

One of the symptoms common to many chronic illnesses is "brain fog".  It's a nebulous thing that doesn't sound like much until you're dealing with it.  Once you have dealt with it, you realize how debilitating it is, all on its own.  Trying to describe it to someone else is probably futile, but here goes.  Imagine being incredibly hung over, and being woken up out of the dead sleep of the hung over by a blaring alarm.  If you can imagine (or remember) that feeling of complete disorientation when your brain is refusing to make connections with what's around you and you can't remember where you are, or what's happening and you can't figure it out because neurons seem to be mis-firing... well, that's about it.  Except it doesn't clear up once you wake up, shower, and get some coffee in you.  Or it only partially clears and like the fog that hangs over a swamp, clumps together and drifts in and out throughout the day.  Yep, loads of fun.

It occurred to me to check my blog today, and I was shocked to see that it has been two months since I've posted anything.  Surely not!  But of course, yes it has.  It doesn't seem like it's been that long from my perspective.  But I've been slogging through the days with worsening fatigue and brain fog and hadn't realized how bad it had gotten.  I mean, I *knew*, but I didn't really *realize*.

True to my nature, I realized things were sliding the wrong direction, and I researched the hell out of everything.  I determined that I had all the symptoms of low thyroid, and had requested labs drawn by my doctor.  I've had increased frequency and severity of my migraines since mid-December, and have essentially quit trying to work out or do anything beyond what I've had to in order to get through life.  This 6-week session in school has been a disaster by my standards, as I'm currently pulling a high "C", and while I'm still effective at work it's been an uphill challenge for me and I don't feel I've been as good as I should.

My labs showed my thyroid factors to mostly be in the low end of normal, and my doctor sent me for a sonogram.  Which showed a number of very small nodules which are not concerning for cancer or anything (thank goodness) but my research turned up a link to a medication I've been on for a couple of years now for my rheumatoid disease.  Dr. B had indicated she wanted to try taking me off of it at our last visit to see if I was in remission due to my lack of swollen joints and good labs, but I'd been resistant to that.  Now that it seems to be implicated in continuing joint pain, fatigue, and brain fog I guess it's not a bad idea.  I stopped taking it last week, and I believe my fatigue and brain fog are starting to lift.

Of course, chronic illness is teaching me (the hard way) not to trust it when I start feeling good.  I view it with total suspicion.  Is it a trap or a trick?  Is it luring me into trying to do too much today so I'll be flat on my back feeling like a truck ran me over tomorrow?  Or is it for real, but removing the only thing inhibiting my rheumatoid disease going to grant me a few days of blissful normality before the spikes grow back in the arches of my feet and my hands start feeling the vices closing in again?

Hope and trust is what chronic illness robs you of.  Today's post should be one of hope and achievement that I've located what was causing my problem (most likely) and that I'll start feeling better again.  That I'll be able to re-join activities that I've been wanting to, and my quality of life will get better.  Instead my attempt at realism likely reads as hopelessly pessimistic.  I really am not a pessimist.  I believe that I'll navigate this chronic illness and find a balance for my life that works for me.  I just have quit believing that I'll ever see what I used to think of as "normal" again.  Which is a little sad, and that's OK.  I'm one who believes that if you constantly expect the world to give you roses, and it doesn't, the disappointment crushes you.  But if you prepare for it to slap you in the face and every once in a while you get roses, then you're delighted.  Maybe there's a middle ground I've yet to find.  We'll see.

Well, it finally happened.  Munchkin has flown the coop.

Shortly before Thanksgiving last year, Munchkin's dad (Ex#1) passed away after long-standing health issues.  As she dealt with cleaning out his hoard (seriously, I'd forgotten how much stuff that man could cram into a closet) she decided she would keep the lease on his duplex and her BFF would move in with her.  It's taken her this long to get the place liveable and get the bulk of his stuff cleared out in between school and work.

But this week Muchkin & roomie decided even though things aren't 100% ready, to start sleeping over there and get the rest done while living in it.  So I'm officially an empty nester.  Though my garage will be serving as a storage facility for Munchkin's overflow for the forseeable future, and she hasn't completely cleared out her room yet.  Hopefully she'll finish that out this weekend.  Her leasing company bans pit bulls, so the dogs will be staying with us, and I imagine Munchkin will still be a frequent visitor.  We'll just have to train her to text before she comes over so we can put clothes on.  LOL.

So it hasn't quite hit me or the Mister yet.  We'll have our hands full for a while moving our own furniture around and filling space back up, as we get used to rattling around in the house by ourselves.  I plan to take over Munchkin's old room and turn it into my office/craft space and we'll see how the rest of it comes together.  I think we'll adjust to it just fine, I don't anticipate being all weepy over my baby being on her own.  But you never know until you are actually dealing with a situation, right?  We'll see how it goes.