Monthly Archives: February 2017

Well, it finally happened.  Munchkin has flown the coop.

Shortly before Thanksgiving last year, Munchkin's dad (Ex#1) passed away after long-standing health issues.  As she dealt with cleaning out his hoard (seriously, I'd forgotten how much stuff that man could cram into a closet) she decided she would keep the lease on his duplex and her BFF would move in with her.  It's taken her this long to get the place liveable and get the bulk of his stuff cleared out in between school and work.

But this week Muchkin & roomie decided even though things aren't 100% ready, to start sleeping over there and get the rest done while living in it.  So I'm officially an empty nester.  Though my garage will be serving as a storage facility for Munchkin's overflow for the forseeable future, and she hasn't completely cleared out her room yet.  Hopefully she'll finish that out this weekend.  Her leasing company bans pit bulls, so the dogs will be staying with us, and I imagine Munchkin will still be a frequent visitor.  We'll just have to train her to text before she comes over so we can put clothes on.  LOL.

So it hasn't quite hit me or the Mister yet.  We'll have our hands full for a while moving our own furniture around and filling space back up, as we get used to rattling around in the house by ourselves.  I plan to take over Munchkin's old room and turn it into my office/craft space and we'll see how the rest of it comes together.  I think we'll adjust to it just fine, I don't anticipate being all weepy over my baby being on her own.  But you never know until you are actually dealing with a situation, right?  We'll see how it goes.

In my last post, I referenced my autoimmune disorder as 'rheumatoid disease' (RD) instead of calling it psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.  I'm going to continue using the terms autoimmune disorder (AI) or rheumatoid disease (RD) instead of PsA or RA because it better describes the disease process instead of just one of the symptoms.  The naming of the diseases by one of the symptoms has caused a lot of the public to be very confused about how serious these conditions are.

One of the biggest misconceptions about PsA or RA is caused by the word 'arthritis'.  Without getting too medical with you, the term arthritis basically just means inflamed joints with stiffness.  There are many reasons people get arthritis, and autoimmune conditions are just one group of those reasons.  People tend to think of all arthritis as one thing though, and so those of us with RD hear a lot of things like "my grandmother had that, and Tylenol was all she needed for her pain" or "your joints would quit hurting if you lost weight" or "I have that, and I take glucosamine and it fixed it".

It is incredibly frustrating to have RD and people continually tell you how to fix it.  It's even more frustrating when they're telling you how to fix it and they don't even understand the condition.  This is not your grandmother's arthritis.  Unless, of course, your grandmother had RD in which case you should know better.

I sound harsh.  I should apologize.

But I won't.

Instead, I'm going to offer some insight for those of you tempted to tell me how to fix my RD, imply that my pain isn't real or isn't significant, or imply that I'm suffering this just because I'm not trying hard enough to fix it.

RD is a systemic disease, and a malfunction of the immune system.  If whatever cure you're proposing had real merit, the rheumatologists and patient groups would be all over it instead of prescribing immune suppressing drugs up to and including chemotherapy agents.  So while gluten-free, paleo, nightshade elimination, yoga, magic supplements or whatever can help some RD patients, it is by no means something that will work for everyone.  Some of these, like certain supplements, are contraindicated with some medications.  Many RD patients are struggling just to get by and can't manage special diets or we've already tried them.

There is virtually zero chance that you would be the first person to suggest ANY of these thing to an RD patient who has had the diagnosis longer than 12 hours and access to the internet.  Please, for the love of all that's holy, keep it to yourself.

I know you want to help find a solution for your friend or loved one.  That's human nature.  Believe me, we want a solution.  But by the time we've heard that tumeric will cure our pain for the hundredth time, and either we can't take it with our current medicine or we tried it and it doesn't work, we just want to scream.  Same goes for every other "cure" out there.

You can absolutely help, though.  Until medicine or magic comes up with a real cure, we need all the help, love, and support we can get in adjusting to our new normal and managing our condition the best we can.  Be understanding when we can't participate with things the way we used to, or cancel at the last minute because we're out of spoons.  Offer tangible help when and where you can (and when we need it) in the form of preparing food, childcare, housekeeping, lawn care, handyman services, or just plain old companionship.  If you're a person who researches medical things, by all means let us know if you see a report or journal talking about a truly new treatment or breakthrough.  If nothing else, just let us know that you hear us, witness our struggle, and let us know you're with us.  It helps more than you know.

Winter is a hard time to be a Spoonie.  Well, it is for me, anyway.  Here in Texas, the weather is mostly mild, but weather fronts come through every few days and the temperature variances are crazy.  Yesterday it was in the high 70s, this morning it was in the low 30s and we'll have a high in the high 50s and by Friday it'll be in the 80s.  Even on medication, my joints don't know what to make of this insanity.  I woke up this morning incredibly fatigued even though I slept well most of the night, and all of my joints aching furiously.  Luckily, it's a work from home day for me, so I can wrap up in a blanket and turn the space heater on.

I'm still adjusting to the idea that I have a chronic condition and that my life will never be like it was before.  My brain stubbornly resists even thinking the word 'disability' even though I've technically had one most of my life, and now I have two.  Migraines run in my family and we all just live with it the best we can.  It's only after learning about my rheumatoid disease and researching about it that I've realized that it's really my second chronic condition, and yes, disability.  I don't know why I'm finding it painful and shaming to use that word.  It feels overly dramatic, and somehow minimizing of people with more profound disabilities.  I mean, after all, I can still get around, take care of myself, and hold down a job.  Where do I get off calling myself disabled?

Just typing that out, I find that I really, intensely hate the term 'disabled'.  I'm not disabled, dammit.  I have a condition, and one that imposes some disability, but I'm not disabled.  The distinction seems to be an argument about being politically correct, but I'm learning that it feels completely different to say I'm disabled versus I have a disability.  I don't think there should be a law about it or anything, but I think people who are impacted by something have the right to speak out about it and ask for consideration in the way people refer to it.

So yes, life looks different as a Spoonie.  I have to ask for accommodations at work.  Nothing huge, since I already have the ability to work from home, but I need to be able to use that as needed instead of on a regular schedule.  I have to prioritize things in my life, and some things just don't make the cut.  I can't burn the candle at both ends and then catch up on sleep a week or two later like I did when I was younger.  Something has to give.  Right now the top priorities are family, work, and school.  If I don't have the energy, cleaning and cooking don't make the cut.  I don't bounce back from illness and injury the way I used to, so I have to take an extra day or two when I've been sick.  I'm really having to learn to take better care of myself, because allowing one condition to flare up inevitably causes the other to as well.  The cascade of pain and illness costs are huge when that happens.

I've read articles by Spoonies who say their illness is a blessing.  I can't go that far.  What I can say is that there are beneficial lessons that can come from hardship.  Learning to let go of things that aren't as important as others and taking better care of myself are good things.  I won't ever be grateful that I developed rheumatoid disease, or migraines for that matter.  But I will figure out how to live the best life I can with them.